22 thoughts on “Beer Talk: Heady Topper Is Not An NE Style IPA! (The History of New England IPA) – Ep. #1700

  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    I like hazy, tropical, low bitter IPA's…..I'm in Connecticut so lots of NEIPA's floating around…..Tried the Dabble 6.0 and loved it…I also like Siera Nevada Torpedo Tropical, not the extra pale ale.   Can you recommend 3 IPA's that would fit into my preferences of hazy, tropical, and low IBU?   Thank you and keep the reviews a comin'

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    The beer style that essentially ruined beer reviews, as they are generally unavailable in Cali unless you want to trade or stand in lines.

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    Focal Banger is also very dank/ bitter!! Síp of Sunshìne is my go to IPA. Full of citrus flavor & juicy goodness!

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    How about we just say it’s beer. Why do people get so butthurt over ipa’s. Most beers are so overhyped anymore because there is such bias. Pretty soon there will be arguing over Midwest ipa’s.

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    susan is one of the best NEIPAS … heady is one of a kind doesnt really neatly fit into any category, while it has some qualities that i expect in NEIPA, it predates the NEIPA craze by so many years as you described so its not surprising how different and unique it is. that being said ive had some hazy batches of heady that have just as much fruity character as dankness and bitterness so in that sense i think it could be considered NEIPA

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    My experience with US-made NEIPA's, the home of the NEIPA really, is none. You can't really get them very easily in the Netherlands, so my comments are limited to UK and Dutch made mostly, if I want to get fresh ones. And that is, that NEIPA means nothing anymore. Any superhazy, superhopped, superfruity beer will be called NEIPA quite fast, with a lot of them of lower quality, with quite some hopburn. I'm getting bored with a lot of them. Good for two or three sips, but after that it's all the same. Not layers, no real complexity. But then again, maybe that's just me. I prefer the older styles of superdanky IPA's, before the hazecraze.

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    I agree with a sentiment that many others share. Its the prototypical NEIPA. That being said, I prefer Heady over any NEIPA.

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    I consider Heady Topper to be a proto-New England-style DIPA. Technically it is closer to West Coast style, (not as hazy, has some bitterness., etc.) but it did introduce the ideas of more restrained bitterness, fruity flavors, expressive yeast profile, and it was unfiltered. More important yet, I think Heady Topper more than any other IPA is responsible for popularizing the 16 oz can format that is almost universal among NEIPAs today.

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    Heady never was to be a NEIPA, it has always been a DIPA. Anyone that thinks it is a NEIPA, doesn't know a lager from a stout.

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    Completely agree. It’s funny you posted this video today. I was literally having this conversation with a customer yesterday and explained the exact same thing.

    He asked me what Chicago New England ipa is closest to Heady Topper, and I told him it’s actually something like NvU that I’d compare to Heady. Not any of the hyped New England breweries

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    Keep up the great content Dar! Your enthusiasm is contagious and your personality is a plus to the beer industry no doubt.

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    I appreciate the history of those great breweries but NE IPA has specific style notes now concerning oats, low IBU etc

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    I couldn't agree more, just visited the Alchemist and Hill and Heady is way more bitter than beers I consider NEIPA. Oh and "Susan" was the first HF beer I had and it was ridiculous, loved it.

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    I think it started the NEIPA style, but the style has radically morphed into something else since then. Now we're seeing these low IBU milkshake-looking NEIPAs. I think it's safe to say there are sub-sets even within the NEIPA style.

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    This is obviously my personal opinion, but I think that Heady Topper, just like other beers like Focal Banger, Sip of Sunshine, Captain’s Daughter, Lunch/Dinner, Fiddlehead/Second Fiddle fall in this category of transition or first-wave NEIPAs. They have a decisive west-coast-y bitterness (and sometimes a piney quality to them), but with the fruity/tropical aromatics (and sometimes body) that you get from this new wave of NEIPAs. I'm sure many will disagree with this pov–and will even dare to classify SoS as a west-coast IPA–but well…

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    Again. The Alchemist brews traditional IPA’s. Delicious, dank, extremely hoppy.
    John Kimmich was way ahead of his time. If you want a creamsicle in a glass, go with NEIPA’s ( Especially Treehouse). John Kimmich of the Alchemist pioneered the way for a true IPA.
    My take. My Opinion.

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    Agreed, just had one last week and forgot how bitter and clear it was.
    Appearance is very important in NEIPAs but the big things I always look for are the aroma and flavor to be smooth, rounded, and "juicy" of course. They can definitely have some bitterness but need malt/sweetness to round it out. Shaun Hill says it best, "rounded, smooth, no harsh edges".

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    I agree with your points Darwin. Furthermore, as some of the other comments mentioned, the NEIPA really has no meaning anymore. Now that it has become the face of craft beer, we have all seen brewers interpretation of the style, from hazy to clear, fruity to dank, no bitterness to heavy bitterness. The style is simply up for interpretation and in my opinion, if you are looking for a NEIPA, you should know what you want out of the specific beer, in terms of the options mentioned above. Unfortunately, people will very quickly abandon the true roots of the style, hopefully, your video will preserve some of the history as its lost over time. Cheers.

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  • March 9, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    That Green Diamonds can! It was the first four pack I bought at Other Half. I remember walking in for the first time and even though their stuff was piney/dank, it was a step above other IPAs in NY. I recently had All Green Everything (DDH and hazy now of course) and felt pretty nostalgic.

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